Tag Archives: exclusion

Appellate Court Clears Up Confusion About Exclusions In Commercial Auto Policies

Like most liability policies, commercial auto policies have exclusions meant to preclude claims by employees against the employer-policyholder.  In a recent case in the Fourth Circuit, under West Virginia law, the court vacated a district court’s judgment of no coverage in favor of the insurer based on exclusions.… Continue Reading

Does a Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Cover the Settlement of Criminal Charges?

Directors and Officers (“D&O”) insurance policies cover individuals and entities for a wide variety of claims for “wrongful acts.”  Many D&O policies provide coverage for claims based on criminal proceedings.  When criminal charges are settled against corporations and officers, very often the settlement includes fines, penalties, cost of investigation and other payments.  Are these payments … Continue Reading

Covered and Uncovered Claims — When Allocation Is Required

Plaintiffs usually don’t bring claims based on the defendant’s insurance coverage.  So it is not unusual for an insurer and policyholder to have a dispute about what claims are covered and what claims are not covered under the insurance policy and, if there are covered and uncovered claims, how to allocate the covered claims to … Continue Reading

Exclusion Relieves Insurer of Duty to Defend in Sex Trafficking Case

Human trafficking is a serious problem.  The current news cycle is filled with stories about human trafficking in the context of immigration and with recent criminal proceedings accusing the rich and famous of underage sex and sex trafficking.  In the mundane world of insurance, sex trafficking has become a coverage issue for insurance companies when … Continue Reading

Faulty Excavation Support Not Covered By Contractor Controlled Insurance Plan

Construction projects are often subject to myriad claims.  Subcontractors can cause damage to third-parties and their property, the project can be delayed by municipal inspections or citations, workers can get injured, and property can be damaged by fire, collapse or weather.  To organize construction projects, sometimes insurance is purchased through a plan.  A contractor controlled … Continue Reading

How Specific Does a Specific Litigation Exclusion Have to Be?

Insurance policies often have general exclusions for known losses or prior acts.  The reason for this is that most insurance is for fortuitous risks–risks that will take place in the future; not risks that already have taken place.  For large policyholders that have ongoing litigation, it is not uncommon for a new carrier to craft … Continue Reading

Second Circuit Rules on Timely Disclaimers Where Two Insurance Companies Are Involved

Under New York law, the rules for a timely disclaimer arising out of an auto accident are found in Insurance Law section 3420(d)(2).  That section requires an insurer to disclaim liability as soon as is reasonably possible or otherwise the disclaimer is ineffective.  In a recent non-precedential appeal, the Second Circuit reversed the district court … Continue Reading

Delaware Superior Court Excludes Coverage for Directors Acting in Dual Capacity as Investors

Directors and officers (“D&O”) liability insurance generally protects directors and officers against legal expenses and personal liability for acts and omissions taken in their capacity as directors and officers of the insured company.  In a recent case, coverage was excluded where directors also acted as investors of the company.… Continue Reading

Windstorm, Storm Surge, Flood Exclusion and Anti-Concurrent Causation Confusion

Back in October, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit issued a Summary Order (no precedential effect) in a Hurricane Sandy storm surge coverage dispute.  The court reversed summary judgment in favor of the insurer and remanded the case back to the district court to assess whether an endorsement’s anti-concurrent causation clause conflicts … Continue Reading

Lack of Inclusion Means Timely Notice of Disclaimer Is Not Required

Typically, courts are strict when it comes to insurance companies disclaiming coverage.  Generally, a disclaimer must be specific and timely for it to have any chance of being effective.  In many cases, an insurance policy has an exclusion that the insurance company contends precludes coverage.  In other cases, the coverage alleged is just not provided … Continue Reading

Breasting Dolphin Piles and Fortuity Under All-Risk Policies

An all-risk policy is meant to cover a loss triggered by any conceivable cause not excluded under the policy. While the burden is on the policyholder to establish a prima facie case for coverage, the policyholder need only show (1) the existence of an all-risk policy, (2) an insurable interest in the subject of the insurance contract, and … Continue Reading

What a Difference a Word Makes

Lack of precision in reinsurance contract wording has been known to engender anomalous results. Often a single word or phrase can cause a court or arbitrator to construe an agreement in ways unintended. In reinsurance arbitrations, when the panel majority decides how a contract operates based on its construction of a word or phrase, the … Continue Reading
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