Archives: Insurance Coverage

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Direct Claims Against Reinsurer Fail to Succeed

Direct actions against reinsurers have been on the rise for some time.  To bring a direct action, a policyholder must get over the contractual privity hurdle and find some basis to show a direct relationship or third-party beneficiary relationship.  Many policyholders try to bring these actions, but they more often than not fail at the … Continue Reading

Errors and Omissions and Directors and Officers Clash Gets Some Clarity From the Second Circuit

Most companies that provide specialized or professional services, like stock exchanges, carry both directors and officers liability insurance (“D&O”) and errors and omissions insurance (“E&O”). These coverages are meant to be complimentary and not overlapping.  D&O covers “wrongful acts” by directors and officers.  E&O covers negligent acts in performing professional services.  D&O policies typically exclude … Continue Reading

Lack of Inclusion Means Timely Notice of Disclaimer Is Not Required

Typically, courts are strict when it comes to insurance companies disclaiming coverage.  Generally, a disclaimer must be specific and timely for it to have any chance of being effective.  In many  cases, an insurance policy has an exclusion that the insurance company contends precludes coverage.  In other cases, the coverage alleged is just not provided … Continue Reading

Why Suing Every Insurance Company in Sight Does Not Always Work

There is a common misconception that suing everyone in sight is a good idea.  Yes, if you don’t know exactly what related companies (or individuals) ultimately may be responsible for the loss it may make sense to cast a wider net (especially if the limitations period is approaching).  But if it is obvious who the … Continue Reading

Failure to Comply With Protective Safeguards Endorsement Results in Loss of Coverage

A Protective Safeguards Endorsement (“PSE”), as defined by my friends at IRMI, is “[a] property insurance endorsement that makes it a condition of coverage that the protective safeguards cited in the endorsement (such as an automatic sprinkler system or night watch guard) be in operation at all times except when the insurer has been notified of … Continue Reading

The Peril of Settling Without Insurer Consent

In an earlier blog post we discussed a Georgia case where settlement occurred without consent from the insured.  In that case, the court held that when a policyholder settles without consent in the face of a consent to settle clause, the policyholder will not succeed in seeking a recovery for that settlement from the insurance … Continue Reading

Counterfactual Thought Experiments Do Not Establish Bad Faith in New York

The title above is taken from a quote found in a recent Second Circuit non-precedential summary order in an insurance bad faith case.  Bad faith is not easy to establish in New York.  Strategic differences between an insurance company and its insured over whether, how and when to settle an underlying case generally do not … Continue Reading

When Notice of Claim Is a Condition Precedent a Default Judgment May Not Help

Notice of claim or suit requirements in insurance policies are often viewed as a condition precedent to coverage.  If the insured’s carrier is not given notice of the claim in a timely manner, the insurer may have no obligation to defend or indemnify the insured.  But what happens if a claimant sues an insured defendant … Continue Reading

Insured v. Insured Exclusion in Directors and Officers Policies

A typical directors and officers liability insurance policy provides coverage for officers and directors of a corporation for all loss that is not indemnified by the corporation resulting from a covered claim for a wrongful act as defined by the policy.  Virtually all D&O policies also include an “Insured v. Insured Exclusion,” which precludes coverage for … Continue Reading

Property Damage Found Despite Growing Crack Originating Prior to Policy Period

A recent case from a New York intermediate appeals court sheds some light on how the courts interpret property and business interruption coverage for power-generating equipment.  The case raised two interesting issues.  First, whether a pre-existing crack in a power-generating turbine precludes coverage.  The second, whether time-element coverage was available for a loss of future … Continue Reading

New York’s 3420(d)(2) Cannot Be Used Between Insurers

We have written a number of blog posts involving New York Insurance Law Section 3420(d)(2), which requires insurance companies to disclaim quickly or waive the right to disclaim.  Parties have tried to rely on 3420(d)(2) in a variety of ways.  In a recent case, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals was asked to address the … Continue Reading

Privity and Additional Insured Coverage

When a worker is injured on a construction job and sues the relevant parties, a side battle often ensues over which carrier has the duty to defend and indemnify the owner, general contractor or subcontractor based on the language in the various construction contracts requiring some or all of those parties to be named as … Continue Reading

The Interminable ‘Insured vs. Insured’ Battle

Recently on our eSquire Global Crossings Blog we shared an article first published in the Bankruptcy Strategist, where Norman Kinel and Elliot Smith explore the practical impact of the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeal’s recent decision in Indian Harbor Insurance Company v. Zucker, et al., 2017 U.S. App. LEXIS 10821, which bankruptcy practitioners – particularly those representing … Continue Reading

Will the Upsurge in Cat Bonds Weather the Storm(s)?

As yet another hurricane bears down on the US, the insurance press is reporting a surge in Cat Bonds and other alternative capital.  Cat Bonds and the amounts reinsured are apparently at a high.  Cat bonds, as we know, respond to catastrophic loss events.  Cat Bonds exist for various types of large property loss events, … Continue Reading

Hurricane Harvey: Anticipating a Flood of Claims and Litigation

The aftermath of Hurricane Harvey will include a surge in insurance claims by homeowners and commercial entities.  Property and casualty insurers should be aware of a Texas insurance reform law relating to claims dispute litigation and recent directives issued by the Texas Department of Insurance. INITIATING CLAIMS DISPUTE LITIGATION – TEXAS HOUSE BILL 1774 House … Continue Reading

Discovery of Reserve and Reinsurance Communications – Part I

In cases where an insurer is a party to an action, numerous discovery disputes have centered on a litigant’s ability to discover the insurer’s loss reserve information and communications with its reinsurers.  The litigant (generally the insured or a co-insurer) may request this information in discovery, hoping to find something in the insurer’s internal communications … Continue Reading

Additional Insured Endorsement Clarified By New York Court of Appeals

The New York Court of Appeals recently issued an important decision on how the Additional Insured endorsement to a Commercial General Liability insurance policy should be interpreted.  It did  so in a split decision and by reversing a decision by the Appellate Division. A vigorous dissent accompanied the opinion.  Commentators are already discussing the ramifications of … Continue Reading

Battle of Other Insurance Clauses In CGL Policies for Contractors

A recent Summary Order from the Second Circuit Court of Appeals highlights the difficulties that often arise with other insurance clauses and additional insureds. Which carrier has the primary duty to defend and indemnify an underlying action is a question that turns up with frequency when there are multiple parties sued and multiple possible applicable insurance … Continue Reading

Notice to Carrier Means Notice to Carrier

Notice requirements in liability insurance policies typically require that notice of a claim or lawsuit be given as soon as practicable and in writing to the insurance company. While the exact language differs from policy to policy, the concept of written notice to the insurance company without delay is fairly common. In the normal circumstance, where … Continue Reading

Breasting Dolphin Piles and Fortuity Under All-Risk Policies

An all-risk policy is meant to cover a loss triggered by any conceivable cause not excluded under the policy. While the burden is on the policyholder to establish a prima facie case for coverage, the policyholder need only show (1) the existence of an all-risk policy, (2) an insurable interest in the subject of the insurance contract, and … Continue Reading

Failure to Disclose Loss History Results in Rescission

When a policyholder, particularly a commercial policyholder, applies for insurance coverage, a key part of the application process is the disclosure of the policyholder’s relevant loss history. When an insurance company receives an application for insurance, that loss history is a critical part of the insurer’s underwriting process to determine whether it is willing to write … Continue Reading
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