Archives: Liability Insurance

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New York’s 3420(d)(2) Cannot Be Used Between Insurers

We have written a number of blog posts involving New York Insurance Law Section 3420(d)(2), which requires insurance companies to disclaim quickly or waive the right to disclaim.  Parties have tried to rely on 3420(d)(2) in a variety of ways.  In a recent case, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals was asked to address the … Continue Reading

Privity and Additional Insured Coverage

When a worker is injured on a construction job and sues the relevant parties, a side battle often ensues over which carrier has the duty to defend and indemnify the owner, general contractor or subcontractor based on the language in the various construction contracts requiring some or all of those parties to be named as … Continue Reading

Are Reinsurance Proceeds a Collateral Source?

In many jurisdictions, a rule exists that allows the injured party to collect damages from a tortfeasor even if the injured party has received benefits from sources independent of the tortfeasor.  The theory is that the tortfeasor should not be allowed to benefit from the injured party’s foresight in acquiring insurance to protect him or … Continue Reading

Notice to Carrier Means Notice to Carrier

Notice requirements in liability insurance policies typically require that notice of a claim or lawsuit be given as soon as practicable and in writing to the insurance company. While the exact language differs from policy to policy, the concept of written notice to the insurance company without delay is fairly common. In the normal circumstance, where … Continue Reading

Replacing a Roof Is Not Demolition

Many liability insurance policies exclude coverage for bodily injury or property damage arising out of structural alterations that involve changing the size of or moving buildings or other structures, new construction or demolition operations performed by or on behalf of the named insured. Construction insurance policies typically cover these risks, not general liability policies. A … Continue Reading
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